Education

  • Ph.D. (Law) Irish Center for Human Rights, National University of Ireland – 2012 
  • M.A. (Theology) La Salle University – 2015 
  • M.S. (Criminal Justice) Saint Joseph’s University – 2004
  • B.A. (Criminal Justice) Rutgers University – 2002 

Photo of Harry Rhea

Camden Campus
Sociology Building
405-7 Cooper Street
Camden, NJ 08102

harry.rhea@rutgers.edu
(856) 225-2714

Curriculum Vitae

Dr. Harry M. Rhea is an expert on United States foreign policy and international criminal justice.  He previously held dual faculty appointments in the School of International and Public Affairs and the College of Law at Florida International University, where he was instrumental in developing and administering the proposal for the first Ph.D. in international crime and justice in the United States. Dr. Rhea is the author of The United States and International Criminal Tribunals (Intersentia, 2012) and several articles on war crimes investigative commissions and international criminal courts. In 2013, he was awarded the Roslyn Muraskin Emerging Scholar Award from the Northeastern Association of Criminal Justice Sciences. In 2005, he was inducted into the Golden Key International Honor Society as an honorary faculty member. He will serve as Chair of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences International Section from 2017-2019.

 

 

BIOGRAPHYPUBLICATIONSEXPERTISECOURSES

Harry M. Rhea is Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice at Rutgers University in Camden, New Jersey. He teaches criminal law and courts, comparative criminal justice, and international criminal justice.  He previously held a dual appointment as Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice in the Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs and Assistant Professor of Law in the College of Law at Florida International University, where he helped develop the first Ph.D. in international crime and justice in the United States. 

Dr. Rhea holds B.A. and M.S. degrees in criminal justice from Rutgers University and Saint Joseph’s University and a M.A. in theology from La Salle University. He holds a Ph.D. in international criminal law from the Irish Center for Human Rights at the National University of Ireland, Galway, School of Law. Dr. Rhea has studied international criminal law at many prestigious international institutions, including Oxford University, Salzburg Law School, International Institute of Higher Studies in Criminal Sciences, and the Grotius Center for International Legal Studies at the University of Leiden – The Hague.  He studied international war crimes investigations and the prevention of mass atrocities at the Institute for International Criminal Investigations and the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies. Dr. Rhea is the author of the book, titled The United States and International Criminal Tribunals (Cambridge: Intersentia 2012) and several articles on war crimes investigative commissions and international criminal courts.  His research focuses specifically on United States foreign policy and international criminal justice.

Dr. Rhea served as Executive Director of the Council for American Students in International Negotiations in 2007.  Also in 2007, he served as a delegation leader at the Sixth Session of the Assembly of States Parties to the International Criminal Court. Dr. Rhea previously served as Editor-in-Chief of the Interdisciplinary Journal of Human Rights Law.  He was elected Vice Chair of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences International Section. He serves in that position from 2015-2017 after which he will succeed to the position as Chair and will serve in that position from 2017-2019.  Dr. Rhea is a member of Oxford University’s War Crimes Research Network.  Prior to his studies, he served in the United States Marine Corps from 1995 to 1999.

Dr. Rhea was inducted into the Golden Key International Honor Society as an honorary faculty member in 2005.  He was awarded the Roslyn Muraskin Emerging Scholar Award from the Northeastern Association of Criminal Justice Sciences in 2013.  His course (International Law and Global Security) was awarded the Best Course Award, voted by the professional MA in global affairs Class of 2016, in the Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs at Florida International University.

Book

The United States and International Criminal Tribunals: An Introduction (2012).

Articles and Book Chapters

United States Public Support for the International Criminal Court: A Multivariate Analysis of Attitudes and Attributes (with Ryan C. Meldrum) 37 U. Pa. J. Int’l L. 739-762 (2015).

United States Foreign Policy and the International Penal Tribunal in the Genocide Convention: Article VI and Beyond, 9 Genocide Stud. Int’l 186-207 (2015).

The Commission on the Responsibility of the Authors of the War and on Enforcement of Penalties and its Contribution to International Criminal Justice After the Second World War, 25 Crim. L. Forum 147-169 (2014).        

Paris 1919 and Rome 1998: Different Treaties, Different Presidents, Different Senates, and the Same Dilemma, 20 Transnat’l L. & Contemp. Probs. 411-429 (2011).

International Criminal Courts, in Routledge Handbook of International Criminology 134-141 (Cindy J. Smith et al. eds. 2011).

Collective Memory, International Law, and Restorative Social Processes after Conflagration: The Holocaust (with Mary J. Gallant), 20 Int’l. Crim. Just. Rev. 265-279 (2010).                                                                .

The United States and International Criminal Tribunals: An Historical Analysis, 16 ILSA J. of Int’l & Comp. L. 19-38 (2009).

An International Criminal Tribunal for Iraq after the First Gulf War: What Should Have Been, 19 Int’l. Crim. Just. Rev. 308-321 (2009).

The Nuremberg Effect on Contemporary International Criminal Justice, 21 Crim. Just. Stud. 361-372 (2008).

Setting the Record Straight: Criminal Justice at Nuremberg, 7 J. of the Inst. of Just. & Int’l Stud. 250-260 (2007).

Integration of Police in the United States: Changes and Development after 9/11 (with Allan Y. Jiao), 17 Policing & Soc’y 388-408 (2007).

A Difference of Opinion between the United States and Canada concerning the International Criminal Court (with Allan Y. Jiao), 6 J. of the Inst. of Just. & Int’l Stud. 251-258 (2006).

  • International Criminal Justice
  • Transnational Criminal Justice
  • International Human Rights Law
  • War Crimes Investigations
  • Comparative Criminal Justice
  • International Institutions
  • Global Governance
  • Criminal Law and Courts
  • Comparative Criminal Justice Systems
  • Constitutional Issues in Law Enforcement
  • International Criminal Justice
  • Police and Policing